Super Bowl 2015 Pt. 5: Closing Thoughts

Kat Gordon covered this year’s ad emphasis on cultural awareness in Adweek’s Super Bowl print edition, and she made some good points. This year was an awful year for NFL publicity with elevator beatings, toddler corporal punishment, rape accusations, etc.  The NFL did need to steer clear of adding to that fire aka frat-bro humor, sex appeal ads, and condescending spots. But my gamewatch group came to the consensus that something is wrong with our country. “What state do people think our country’s in? America’s doing alright” summed my brother.

And I agree, it was too much. One behavioral psychology book, Thinking Fast and Slow, talks about the availability heuristic and how the more a message is available to you, the more you think it’s an issue. Take house earthquakes for example: they spike insurance purchases because they’re newsworthy. But really, the numbers those insurance actuaries play with all day will probably say that natural disasters  hardly happen at all, especially after an  earthquake JUST happened. Similarly, if all these brands keep pushing these current problems down our throat, we’re going to believe our society is in a bad place. Yes, there’s always room for improvement, but geez, all most people really want to do is watch the game and be entertained.

 

Miscellaneous Thoughts:

  1. Katy Perry crushed it.
  2. Left shark did not crush it.
  3. Pete Carroll did not crush it. Even left shark would have called a running play.
  4. Hats off to any 37 year old quarterback who can win the Super Bowl, even if you do play for the Colts’ arch nemesis.
  5. Public transit is not fun, because snow:

Chicago snow 2015 January super bowl

 

Super Bowl 2015 Recap Pt. 3: The Bad

Super Bowl 2015 Bad Ads Nationwide

MAN WHO LET NATIONWIDE INTO THE PARTY? That Nationwide PSA ad was a buzzkill, as proven by the Twittersphere.

Yes, Nationwide showed it cares about higher purposes and current societal issues, and they captured attention in an alarming way. But the Super Bowl audience is a group that showed up to their couch to relax, laugh, and have a good time. Their mindset is anything but serious (unless you were a Seahawks for Patriots fan). There’s really not great time to show this ad, but don’t show it on the most cynical ad night of the year!  I’d worry that brand perception took a step back with the way Nationwide blew up on Twitter. Although Nationwide did try to end on Mindy’s happier note, I just don’t think it was enough. Lots of good press this week, though.

Carnival & Jeep

Adweek echoed my initial reaction to each ad earlier this week – “man this is a beautiful spot, but it’s already been done!” The old-school speech voiceover combined with beautiful imagery raised a few goosebumps, but in the end, but it felt much too similar to RAM’s recent “Farmer” commercial. Maybe this style needed a year to breathe, but let’s add to the conversation, shall we?

 

Super Bowl 2015 Recap Pt. 2: How to Pull Off a Celeb Tweet

How to Pull Off a Celeb Tweet Super Bowl

Any search of #ad or #sponsored will fill up your Twitter feed with a boatload of forced, ingenuine, and often cringeworthy tweets. But I thought Always’ #LikeAGirl & Mindy’s Nationwide tweets nailed it. Always used Demi Lovato to sound off their #LikeAGirl campaign, and it felt like a perfect fit:

Demi Lovato Super Bowl Tweet

 

She’s proud, it’s authentic, and the #ad at the end is more like a Super Bowl tag given the night’s context. Mindy Kaling’s tweet didn’t even include the #ad tag, she just tweeted it!

Mindy Kaling Super Bowl Tweet

 

This selfie movement is starting to really wear on me, but I loved how Nationwide leveraged Mindy’s social following to continue the story of their commercial. Plus Matt’s face looks like he just watched the first Nationwide Super Bowl commercial…

Super Bowl 2015 Recap Pt. 1: Go Beyond the Ad

Super Bowl 2015 Go Beyond The Ad

The Super Bowl.

The single biggest annual sporting event on the planet.

The pinnacle of creative television advertising.

And perhaps the quickest way to blow $4.5 million dollars outside of Las Vegas.

After awhile, Super Bowl ads have earned a high enough reputation to become a showcase of criticisms, like a one-night museum collection – you can put anything on a museum pedestal, call it art, and suddenly viewers start forming normally non-existent opinions. But instead of a museum, you have a Super Bowl TV schedule. So, here’s my six part micro-analysis on the good, the bad, the best, the game, and the left shark.

 

Go Beyond the Ad

Teressa Iezzi opens The Idea Writers with Droga5’s David Droga earning a spot on the 2006 Esquire “Best and Brightest” list. Being a man of the ad industry, Esquire asked him to create an ad about himself. Rather, he activated Tap Project, a UNICEF campaign supporting clean drinking water worldwide, within the ad. After a website, some restaurant endorsements, a fundraising event, water essays & more, $0 media dollars turned into $5.5 million. Droga ventured beyond the printed page and won.

Like Droga’s ad, extensions of ad mediums like print or TV such as McDonalds Pay with Lovin’ Super Bowl ad and Coca Cola’s Make It Happy ads are nothing new. In fact, the actual stories in the ads felt a little far-fetched, as alluded to by Adweek in a recap post earlier this week. But it was great to see these players launch campaigns that are part of campaigns bigger than a single 30 second blip. I’m really looking forward to how the McDonald’s campaign takes shape, and it would be great to see Coca Cola’s turn-a-frown-upside-down social media initiative explore more of 2015. Too bad Coke pulled it this week. 😦